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Inverters

Inverters are essential for an array of different applications, thus a range of capacities and features are available on the market.  This discussion focuses on important inverter types and applications, especially with regard to renewable energy and battery storage.

IHFI Completes Guyana PV Installations

USAID’s Improving Health Facility Infrastructure (IHFI) project recently completed the installation of 12 solar photovoltaic systems at nine remote health clinics in Guyana.  Installations took place over a five-week period, with IHFI staff travelling alongside the installers to monitor progress, ensure code compliance and provide training to local technicians and health workers.

It’s World Immunization Week, a week designated by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an opportunity to build awareness on the benefits and challenges of vaccination, celebrate progress in vaccination coverage and take a close look at the road ahead – including environmental impacts and the role of clean energy.

Maintenance Logs and Checklists

Maintenance logs and task checklists should be maintained for all on-site energy supply equipment.

Best Practices and Lessons Learned

This section provides a short summary of some key lessons learned concerning efforts to provide reliable energy supplies to developing country health facilities.

Batteries and Battery Management

Batteries are a critical component in nearly all energy systems involving an intermittent power source, including diesel generation, solar PV systems, wind, or intermittent grid; but have proven to be one of the most challenging components of an energy system to maintain.

Photovoltaic (PV) Systems

Photovoltaic (PV) Systems generate electricity from sunlight collected by solar panels. Energy collected in this manner can be used to supply direct power to electrical equipment, or it can be stored in batteries to provide indirect power.

Kalungi Hospital is located 125 kilometers south of Kampala, Uganda, off the Kampala-Masaka Highway. The facility serves as both a health clinic and a nursing school; nurses who complete the Kalungi program are deployed into village hospitals. The hospital has a seven person staff with one medical assistant. The clinic sees 20 to 30 patients daily; this number increases to about 50 during malaria season. Some patients can pay a small fee of roughly 400 shillings, or 22 cents.

Guyana: Micobee and Tumatumari

Micobee and Tumatumari are small health clinics in Guyana separated by about five miles. These facilities serve a resident population of 360 as well as 300 miners from small villages along the river. Both facilities are attended by a part time local health worker. These facilities are typical of the large number of health posts scattered throughout the interior of Guyana and most other developing countries.

Guyana: Mahdia District Hospital

Mahdia district hospital in Guyana serves a resident population of 1000 which swells to 4000 with the addition of workers from local mining operations. It is a priority area for the PEPFAR program based on the high-risk behavior of the mining community. Mahdia can be reached by a six hour drive from the capital Georgetown on dirt roads. The Regional Health Officer (RHO) in Mahdia identified power as his number one challenge. Mahdia district hospital is thought to be representative of district hospitals in Region I, IX, and VII of Guyana which are connected to quasi-grids but provide intermittent and low quality power.

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The Powering Health Stories blog brings you current trends in the worlds of health, energy and development, as well as features on current work being undertaken by USAID.  If you have a story that you would like us to cover or one that you would like to contribute, contact us This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. !